Movie Poster Potpourri

There’s no particular theme or category for this collection of film posters, other than they’re dynamic and dramatic. Some are foreign posters for American films, some are for films both well-known and obscure, and some are just weird, but they’re all pretty cool.

________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________________________

Title and year for films are listed below in the order they appear above (countries for foreign posters are also indicated):

Frankenstein (1931, Sweden), The Bride of Frankenstein (1935, France), The Public Enemy (1931), Pickup (1951), 42nd Street (1933, France), The Nightclub Queen (1934), The Devil Is a Woman (1935), We Have Our Moments (1937, Sweden), Trouble in Paradise (1932, Finland), Woman (1918, Sweden), Laugh Clown Laugh (1928, Sweden), Doctor X (1932), Paradise Canyon (1935), The Sea Spoilers (1936), The Loves of Edgar Allan Poe (1942), Jekyll’s Inferno (1960), The Hideous Sun Demon (1959), Son of Kong (1933), Things to Come (1936, Sweden), The Chase (1966, Spain), Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956, Italy).

This post is a follow-up to two previous posts, “Movie Poster Art: Foreign Versions” (6/30/14) and “Movie Poster Art for Art’s Sake” (12/30/16). If you’d like to see more film posters, they’re just a Google away. – Ted Hicks

About Ted Hicks

Iowa farm boy; have lived in NYC for 40 years; worked in motion picture labs, film/video distribution, subtitling, media-awards program; obsessive film-goer all my life.
This entry was posted in Film, Film posters. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Movie Poster Potpourri

  1. David M Fromm says:

    The posters are wonderful

  2. Hi Ted,

    That’s a pretty spectacular selection of poster art. Thanks.

    Stefanie

  3. Sharon Pfahl says:

    Amazing poster followup. I’d love to have every one of them — as I can become incredibly greedy when the artwork is that extraordinary. Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s