Movie Poster Potpourri – Take 2

As with last year’s “Movie Poster Potpourri,” there’s no particular theme or category for this collection of film posters, other than they’re dynamic and dramatic. They all got my attention in one way or another. These are for films both well-known and obscure. It’s easy to see why vintage posters have become so collectable. Many of the ones in this post are artistic, often beautiful, or just in your face in ways today’s film posters don’t begin to touch. This is a bit of a grab bag, but I think they’re all pretty cool.

I’ve also included a few slides that used to be shown in theaters during the silent movie era, plus an incredible Clara Bow cover for the magazine “Motion Picture Classic” (don’t know the year), and the cover of the first issue of “The Edison Kinetogram,” published in London in 1910.

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I got a kick out of the one above. What else would you applaud with? Your feet?

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Here we have two decidedly different approaches to the same Western movie, followed by a very nice poster for The Oregon Trail.

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Title and year for films are listed below in the order they appear above (countries for foreign posters are also indicated):

The Fighting Streak (1922), Deadwood Pass (1933), Cimarron (1931), The Walking Dead (1936), I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957), Somewhere in the Night (1946), Side Street (1950), The Wild Party (1929), Red Hair (1928), Red Headed Woman (1932), Psycho (1960), Quality Street (1937), Rebecca (1940), A Farewell to Arms (1932), Anna Karenina (Germany, 1920), The Atomic Man (1955), Flash Gordon’s Trip to Mars (1938), Spies (1928), Riddle Gawne (1918), Renegades (1930), 3 Bad Men (1926), The First Kiss (1928), Love Letters (1945), Invisible Stripes (Sweden, 1939), Stranger on the Third Floor (1940), Sirocco (France, 1951), King Kong (1933), The Invisible Man (1933), Dracula (tinted lobby card, 1931), The Black Cat (1934), Beggars of Life (1928), The Kid (1921), Zaza (1923), Fanny (France, 1932), Fighting for Justice (1932), The Oregon Trail (1936), The Phantom of the Opera (Sweden, 1925), Phantom of the Opera (U.S. 1925), Them (1954).

This post is a follow-up to three previous posts, “Movie Poster Art: Foreign Versions” (6/30/14),  “Movie Poster Art for Art’s Sake” (12/30/16), and “Movie Poster Potpourri” (8/31/17) .

That’s all for now. — Ted Hicks

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Hang on, here’s one more.

About Ted Hicks

Iowa farm boy; have lived in NYC for 40 years; worked in motion picture labs, film/video distribution, subtitling, media-awards program; obsessive film-goer all my life.
This entry was posted in Art, Feature films, Film, Film posters. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Movie Poster Potpourri – Take 2

  1. David M Fromm says:

    Always a treat!

  2. James Schwantes says:

    Always love your stuff. FYI. Just got back from Alaska. Learned from the folks in Kake that the Tlingit custom to show appreciation is to stomp your feet. Not sure why, but maybe applauding with seal skin mittens is something akin to the one-hand clapping kona. Also learned I want to be in the sea otter clan, but that is another story.

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